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Tuesday, January 16 2018 @ 09:16 pm PST

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Wednesday Hero

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Paul Gleason

Paul Gleason

Not everyone who could be considered a hero has fought for their country. Paul Gleason, a retired history teacher, has never worn the uniform but in 1965 he wrote his first letter to a soldier, a student of his that joined the Army, and has since written more than 10,000 letters. He can been seen at Burger King just about everyday writing three letters, 15 handwritten pages, to active duty and veterans.

You can read more about Paul Gleason here and here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Lt. Alan Wood
Lt. Alan Wood

90 years old from Sierra Madre, Ca.

May 3, 1922 - April 18, 2013

U.S. Navy

Alan Wood didn't run into a burning building to rescue someone. He isn't credited with charging into the line of fire or piloting a damaged plane to save the crew. But he did play a role in what has become one of the most iconic images of all time. After nearly a month of heavy fighting U.S forces were able to capture the island of Iwo Jima. A flag was raised to seal the victory. When asked is anyone had a larger flag it was Lt. Wood who was able to provide one and a picture that has come to symbolize the sacrifice and heart of the military was taken. On April 18, Alan Wood passed away at the age of 90.

You can read more about Lt. Alan Wood here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis Post Was Suggested By Michael

Capt. Lance P. Sijan

Capt. Lance P. Sijan

25 years old from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

366th Tactical Fighter Wing, 480th Tactical Fighter Squadron

April 13, 1942 - January 22, 1968

U.S. Air Force

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Captain Lance Peter Sijan, United States Air Force, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 366th Tactical Fighter Wing, 480th Tactical Fighter Squadron, as a Prisoner of War being held in Laos and North Vietnam. On 9 November 1967, while on a flight over North Vietnam, Captain Sijan ejected from his disabled aircraft and successfully evaded capture for more than six weeks. During this time, he was seriously injured and suffered from shock and extreme weight loss due to lack of food. After being captured by North Vietnamese soldiers, Captain Sijan was taken to a holding point for subsequent transfer to a prisoner of war camp. In his emaciated and crippled condition, he overpowered one of his guards and crawled into the jungle, only to be recaptured after several hours. He was then transferred to another prison camp where he was kept in solitary confinement and interrogated at length. During interrogation, he was severely tortured; however, he did not divulge any information to his captors. Captain Sijan lapsed into delirium and was placed in the care of another prisoner. During his intermittent periods of consciousness until his death, he never complained of his physical condition and, on several occasions, spoke of future escape attempts. Captain Sijan's extraordinary heroism and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty at the cost of his life are in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Air Force and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Armed Forces.

You can read more about Capt. Sijan here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Col. Leo K. Thorsness

Col. Leo K. Thorsness

81 years old from Madison, Alabama

357th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 355th Tactical Fighter Wing

U.S. Air Force

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. As pilot of an F-105 aircraft, Lieutenant Colonel Thorsness was on a surface-to-air missile suppression mission over North Vietnam. Lieutenant Colonel Thorsness and his wingman attacked and silenced a surface-to-air missile site with air-to-ground missiles and then destroyed a second surface-to-air missile site with bombs. In the attack on the second missile site, Lieutenant Colonel Thorsness’ wingman was shot down by intensive antiaircraft fire, and the two crewmembers abandoned their aircraft. Lieutenant Colonel Thorsness circled the descending parachutes to keep the crewmembers in sight and relay their position to the Search and Rescue Center. During this maneuver, a MIG-17 was sighted in the area. Lieutenant Colonel Thorsness immediately initiated an attack and destroyed the MIG. Because his aircraft was low on fuel, he was forced to depart the area in search of a tanker. Upon being advised that two helicopters were orbiting over the downed crew’s position and that there were hostile MIGs in the area posing a serious threat to the helicopters, Lieutenant Colonel Thorsness, despite his low fuel condition, decided to return alone through a hostile environment of surface-to-air missile and anti-aircraft defenses to the downed crew’s position. As he approached the area, he spotted four MIG-17 aircraft and immediately initiated an attack on the MIGs, damaging one and driving the others away from the rescue scene. When it became apparent that an aircraft in the area was critically low on fuel and the crew would have to abandon the aircraft unless they could reach a tanker, Lieutenant Colonel Thorsness, although critically short on fuel himself, helped to avert further possible loss of life and a friendly aircraft by recovering at a forward operating base, thus allowing the aircraft in emergency fuel condition to refuel safely. Lieutenant Colonel Thorsness’ extraordinary heroism, self-sacrifice and personal bravery involving conspicuous risk of life were in the highest traditions of the military service, and have reflected great credit upon himself and the U.S. Air Force.

You can read more on Col. Thorsness here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Sgt. Anund C. Roark

Sgt. Anund C. Roark

20 years old from Vallejo, California

Company C, 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division

February 17, 1948 - May 16, 1968

U.S. Army

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Sergeant Anund Charles Roark, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kontum Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 16 May 1968. Sergeant Roark was the point squad leader of a small force which had the mission of rescuing 11 men in a hilltop observation post under heavy attack by a company-size force, approximately 1,000 meters from the battalion perimeter. As lead elements of the relief force reached the besieged observation post, intense automatic weapons fire from enemy occupied bunkers halted their movement. Without hesitation, Sergeant Roark maneuvered his squad, repeatedly exposing himself to withering enemy fire to hurl grenades and direct the fire of his squad to gain fire superiority and cover the withdrawal of the outpost and evacuation of its casualties. Frustrated in their effort to overrun the position, the enemy swept the hilltop with small arms and volleys of grenades. Seeing a grenade land in the midst of his men, Sergeant Roark, with complete disregard for his safety, hurled himself upon the grenade, absorbing its blast with his body. Sergeant Roark's magnificent leadership and dauntless courage saved the lives of many of his comrades and were the inspiration for the successful relief of the outpost. His actions which culminated in the supreme sacrifice of his life were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Senior Airman Austin Stoker

Senior Airman Austin Stoker

U.S. Air Force

Senior Airman Austin Stoker replenishes a .50-caliber machine gun after a training mission in Afghanistan in March.

Photo courtesy U.S. Air Force taken by Tech. Sgt. Dennis J. Henry Jr.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Capt. Lyle L. Gordon

Sgt. Darryl Greenwood

U.S. Marines

Colonel William Bowers, commanding officer of 6th Marine Corps District, awards the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal to Sgt. Darryl Greenwood, a recruiter from Recruiting Sub Station Germantown, Recruitng Station Nashville, Tenn., after the graduation of Fox Company aboard Parris Island, S.C., April 5, 2013. Greenwood received the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal as an impact award for his outstanding achievement and performance as a recruiter over the past year and for recruiting one of the four honor graduates of Fox Company, Lance Corporal Daniel Horvath. Greenwood's outstanding performance as a recruiter has directly impacted the quality of recruits being shipped to Parris Island each year, helping mold the future our Corps and meeting our Nation’s national security needs.

Photo By: Cpl Gabrielle Bustos

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Maj. Gen. Frederick Corbin Blesse

Maj. Gen. Frederick Corbin Blesse

91 years old from Melbourne, FL

August 22, 1921 - October 31, 2012

U.S. Air Force

General Blesse was born in Colon, Panama Canal Zone in 1921. His father was a brigadier general in the Medical Corps of the U.S. Army, retiring in 1953. General Blesse graduated from American High School, Manila, the Philippine Islands in April 1939. He graduated from the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, N.Y., in June 1945 with a commission as second lieutenant, and a rating as a pilot in the U.S. Army Air Corps.

You can read more on Maj. Gen. Blesse here and here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Maj. Thomas C. Griffin

Maj. Thomas C. Griffin

96 years old from Cincinnati, OH

July 10, 1916 - February 26, 2013

U.S. Army

Maj. Thomas C. "Tom" Griffin, a B-25 bomber navigator in the audacious Doolittle's Raid attack on mainland Japan during World War II, passed away on February 26. His death at age 96 leaves only four surviving Raiders. Griffin died in a veterans nursing home in northern Kentucky. He was among the 80 original volunteers for the daring April 18, 1942, mission. When they began training, they were told only it would be "extremely hazardous," coming in the aftermath of Japan's devastating attack on Pearl Harbor and a string of other Japanese military successes.

You can read more about Maj. Griffin here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis Post Was Suggested By Michael

Capt. Emil Kapaun

Capt. Emil Kapaun

35 years old from Pilsen, Kansas

3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry

April 20, 1916 - May 23, 1951

U.S. Army

Not only is Emil Joseph Kapaun to be awarded the Medal Of Honor on April 11 for his actions while a POW in North Korea in 1951, he's also being considered for Sainthood by the Catholic church. While being held captive he would selflessly help his fellow POW's by giving them his food, raising morale and stealing medicine amongst other things. And because he was a priest he constantly ministered to the dead and dying while performing baptisms, hearing first Confessions, offering Holy Communion and celebrating Mass from an improvised altar set up on the front end of an army jeep. Capt. Kapaun died on May 23, 1951 when he developed a blood clot in his leg, dysentery, and pneumonia.

You can read more about Capt. Kapaun here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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