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Sunday, August 19 2018 @ 06:22 pm PDT

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PJ News

PJ StuffNational Geographic Greenlights "Act of Valor" Scripted Pararescue Series
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Fierce Honor

General News Wounded Ranger Salutes Commander Despite Injuries

"Josh, whom everybody in the room (over 50 people) assumed to be unconscious, began to move his right arm under the blanket in a diligent effort to salute the Commander as is customary during these ceremonies. Despite his wounds, wrappings, tubes, and pain, Josh fought the doctor who was trying to restrain his right arm and rendered the most beautiful salute any person in that room had ever seen."

And so today the messy house, the annoying exterminator, the long to-do list and even spats with friends fade into the background where they belong. This fierce honor stands apart.

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1 am

General NewsOne of the most helpful books I've read this year is Dangerous Instincts: Use an FBI Profiler's Tactics to Avoid Unsafe Situations"

I'll admit that I didn't do all the exercises, but one stood out: Think about the major decisions you've made and whether they were good or bad, and find the common threads in each category.

Thinking through the decisions that went badly was a serious "aha" moment. The worst decisions I've made were attempts to relieve stress by changing my circumstances, when I felt pressure to decide instantly, and when I only saw limited options open. "Decide, or else" was the theme of those times.

That knowledge has made a difference. Stress has been really high these last couple months, and I want relief. I want to break loose, live somewhere else, do something else. I had some enticing opportunities a couple weeks ago. And a few nights ago at 1 am, I was so close to writing an incautious email because it felt like something, anything, had to give. But because of this book, I was able to take a step back and say, "No, I'm not in a good place for making decisions right now. These things can wait." And I'm very glad I gave myself some space, because even two days later I can see that those things would have been mistakes.

You may or may not be prone to 1 am bad decisions. But you can save a lot of heartache by evaluating your decision-making processes. Take a look at Dangerous Instincts. It might keep you safe.

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Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero Blogroll This post was suggested by Michael

Cmdr. Samuel David
Dealey

Cmdr. Samuel David Dealey

37 years old from Dallas, Texas

Commander USS Harder (SS-257)

September 13, 1906 - August 24, 1944

U.S.
Navy

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Harder during her 5th War Patrol in Japanese-controlled waters. Floodlit by a bright moon and disclosed to an enemy destroyer escort which bore down with intent to attack, Comdr. Dealey quickly dived to periscope depth and waited for the pursuer to close range, then opened fire, sending the target and all aboard down in flames with his third torpedo. Plunging deep to avoid fierce depth charges, he again surfaced and, within 9 minutes after sighting another destroyer, had sent the enemy down tail first with a hit directly amidship. Evading detection, he penetrated the confined waters off Tawi Tawi with the Japanese Fleet base 6 miles away and scored death blows on 2 patrolling destroyers in quick succession. With his ship heeled over by concussion from the first exploding target and the second vessel nose-diving in a blinding detonation, he cleared the area at high speed. Sighted by a large hostile fleet force on the following day, he swung his bow toward the lead destroyer for another "down-the-throat" shot, fired 3 bow tubes and promptly crash-dived to be terrifically rocked seconds later by the exploding ship as the Harder passed beneath. This remarkable record of 5 vital Japanese destroyers sunk in 5 short-range torpedo attacks attests the valiant fighting spirit of Comdr. Dealey and his indomitable command.

You can read more about Cmdr. Dealey here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by Gail

Cpl. Michael J.
Crescenz

Cpl. Michael J. Crescenz

19 years old from Philadelphia, Penn.

4th Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 196th Infantry Brigade

January 14, 1949 - November 20, 1968

U.S.
Army

On Nov. 20, 1968, Michael J. Crescenz of Philadelphia walked into an ambush on Nui Chom. His squad was pinned down when he made a snap decision to grab an M60 machine gun and charge the bunkers. He took out three, killing six enemy soldiers who may have been dumbstruck in their last seconds to see a lone American running into their fusillade of bullets.

As he charged a fourth bunker, Crescenz, 19, was killed.

For his heroism, he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor:

Cpl. Crescenz distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a rifleman with Company A. In the morning his unit engaged a large, well-entrenched force of the North Vietnamese Army whose initial burst of fire pinned down the lead squad and killed the 2 point men, halting the advance of Company A. Immediately, Cpl. Crescenz left the relative safety of his own position, seized a nearby machine gun and, with complete disregard for his safety, charged 100 meters up a slope toward the enemy's bunkers which he effectively silenced, killing the 2 occupants of each. Undaunted by the withering machine gun fire around him, Cpl. Crescenz courageously moved forward toward a third bunker which he also succeeded in silencing, killing 2 more of the enemy and momentarily clearing the route of advance for his comrades. Suddenly, intense machine gun fire erupted from an unseen, camouflaged bunker. Realizing the danger to his fellow soldiers, Cpl. Crescenz disregarded the barrage of hostile fire directed at him and daringly advanced toward the position. Assaulting with his machine gun, Cpl. Crescenz was within 5 meters of the bunker when he was mortally wounded by the fire from the enemy machine gun. As a direct result of his heroic actions, his company was able to maneuver freely with minimal danger and to complete its mission, defeating the enemy. Cpl. Crescenz's bravery and extraordinary heroism at the cost of his life are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

You can read more about Cpl. Crescenz here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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CCT Book

PJ StuffThe Kindle edition of the Mark Forester biography is free for the next couple days: My Brother in Arms: The Exceptional Life of Mark Andrew Forester, United States Air Force Combat Controller

I haven't had the chance to read it yet but it sounds like a fascinating portrait of a hero, written by his older brother.

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Day of Remembrance

Michael MonsoorToday we honor the Gold Star moms, whose children gave the ultimate sacrifice for our nation.

And today we remember Mike Monsoor, who sacrificed his life for his team seven years ago today. I'm also especially thinking of the mom who raised such a hero.

I know that some of Mike's teammates have since died, but he gave their families more time. More memories. Moms and wives and kids all got what we hunger for: a few more days. Another hug, another smile. No matter that one is never enough. Each moment is a precious jewel worn on our soul forever.

I just read a piece about how Gold Star Moms see the precious life in every soldier. I can't speak for them, but I suspect it's true. All I can say is that for me, being a good mom is a collision course with heartache. Because if you train them right, if they learn to relish a challenge and put other people first, there's a pretty good chance that you'll live worrying about that knock on the door.

I will support my son in any honorable vocation, but I have to confess that he already seems like a mini SEAL or PJ. My job is to support him with training and chances to exercise his natural gifts, and to give him the foundation of faith and character that will guide him long after I'm gone. I could spare myself some heartache and teach him to be a couch potato, but I can't do that to him. I'm too proud of him.

It's a day of remembrance. But it's also a day to gear up and embrace the people and life we've been given.
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Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero Blogroll This Post Was Suggested By Michael

Comdr. Howard W.
Gilmore

Comdr. Howard W. Gilmore

40 years old from Selma, Alabama

September 29, 1902 - February 7, 1943

U.S.
Navy

For distinguished gallantry and valor above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Growler during her Fourth War Patrol in the Southwest Pacific from 10 January to 7 February 1943. Boldly striking at the enemy in spite of continuous hostile air and antisubmarine patrols, Comdr. Gilmore sank one Japanese freighter and damaged another by torpedo fire, successfully evading severe depth charges following each attack. In the darkness of night on 7 February, an enemy gunboat closed range and prepared to ram the Growler. Comdr. Gilmore daringly maneuvered to avoid the crash and rammed the attacker instead, ripping into her port side at 11 knots and bursting wide her plates. In the terrific fire of the sinking gunboat's heavy machineguns, Comdr. Gilmore calmly gave the order to clear the bridge, and refusing safety for himself, remained on deck while his men preceded him below. Struck down by the fusillade of bullets and having done his utmost against the enemy, in his final living moments, Comdr. Gilmore gave his last order to the officer of the deck, "Take her down." The Growler dived; seriously damaged but under control, she was brought safely to port by her well-trained crew inspired by the courageous fighting spirit of their dead captain.

You can read more about Comdr. Gilmore here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Tuesday Scramble

Scrambles40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World

Powerful Peace Ch 3: No One Doesn't Suffer in War

Time to Ditch Your Backup Plan

Ex Royal Marine with a Handgun Saved 100 Lives as Terrorists Ran Amok

Man v. Shark

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Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by Michael

Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt
III

Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt III

56 years old from Cove Neck, NY

September 13, 1887 - July 12, 1944

U.S. Army

When people hear the name Theodore Roosevelt they think President of the United States. What they probably don't think of is Theodore Roosevelt III. The presidents son. A man who, at the age of 56, lead forces in the invasion of Normandy on D-Day and was awarded the Medal Of Honor:

For gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty on 6 June 1944, in France. After 2 verbal requests to accompany the leading assault elements in the Normandy invasion had been denied, Brig. Gen. Roosevelt's written request for this mission was approved and he landed with the first wave of the forces assaulting the enemy-held beaches. He repeatedly led groups from the beach, over the seawall and established them inland. His valor, courage, and presence in the very front of the attack and his complete unconcern at being under heavy fire inspired the troops to heights of enthusiasm and self-sacrifice. Although the enemy had the beach under constant direct fire, Brig. Gen. Roosevelt moved from one locality to another, rallying men around him, directed and personally led them against the enemy. Under his seasoned, precise, calm, and unfaltering leadership, assault troops reduced beach strong points and rapidly moved inland with minimum casualties. He thus contributed substantially to the successful establishment of the beachhead in France.

You can read more about Brig. Gen. Roosevelt here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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