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Sunday, August 19 2018 @ 06:23 pm PDT

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Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero Blogroll
Cpl. Jason L. Dunham
Cpl. Jason L. Dunham 22 years old from Scio, New York

Rifle Squad Leader, 4th Platoon, Company K, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines (Reinforced), Regimental Combat Team 7, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced)

April 22, 2004

U.S.
Marine Corps.

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Corporal Jason L. Dunham, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a Rifle Squad Leader, 4th Platoon, Company K, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines (Reinforced), Regimental Combat Team 7, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), on 14 April 2004. Corporal Dunham's squad was conducting a reconnaissance mission in the town of Karabilah, Iraq, when they heard rocket-propelled grenade and small arms fire erupt approximately two kilometers to the west. Corporal Dunham led his Combined Anti-Armor Team towards the engagement to provide fire support to their Battalion Commander's convoy, which had been ambushed as it was traveling to Camp Husaybah. As Corporal Dunham and his Marines advanced, they quickly began to receive enemy fire. Corporal Dunham ordered his squad to dismount their vehicles and led one of his fire teams on foot several blocks south of the ambushed convoy. Discovering seven Iraqi vehicles in a column attempting to depart, Corporal Dunham and his team stopped the vehicles to search them for weapons. As they approached the vehicles, an insurgent leaped out and attacked Corporal Dunham. Corporal Dunham wrestled the insurgent to the ground and in the ensuing struggle saw the insurgent release a grenade. Corporal Dunham immediately alerted his fellow Marines to the threat. Aware of the imminent danger and without hesitation, Corporal Dunham covered the grenade with his helmet and body, bearing the brunt of the explosion and shielding his Marines from the blast. In an ultimate and selfless act of bravery in which he was mortally wounded, he saved the lives of at least two fellow Marines. By his undaunted courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Dunham gallantly gave his life for his country, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

All Information Was Found On And Copied From MilitaryCity.com

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero. We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Tuesday Scramble

Scrambles(in honor of my brain which is getting scrambled by the constant change of plans)

Parents Rally Against 'Starbase' Education for Kids

Soldier Throws Back Taliban Grenade, Saving Comrades

Help Build WiFi in Afghanistan

Pakistan Arrests American-Born Al Qaida High Schoolers Look to Reagan for Cues at Upcoming Conservative Conference

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Breakers ahead...

General NewsOh, what to say, what to say? Just when I thought I'd worked out a paramedic program that could be completed before the out-of-state move, it turns out that they neglected to include the 7 months of clinicals/internship on the published schedule. It's not absolutely impossible, since I could do my internship in the new state, but I was going to really need that immediate paycheck out there.

So... I've got an appointment set up later this week for my "Hail Mary" option, a program that's as expensive as all heck and probably won't accept me since I'm not an EMT yet and thus don't have the 6 months' experience they want.

Lord have mercy...

The other option of course is to just get my basic and get a nice load of experience before moving to make me hire-able. It could be done, and it would save a lot of sanity in other ways. But I really don't want to stay at Basic. For crying out loud, my goal is air ambulance! Ok, yes, basic is better than nothing. I hear ya.

But there's a part of me that's tempted to shave my head and show up at the next PJ Selection day.
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Oregon Coast in March...

General NewsAll I can say is that it never pays to be smug. This was our weather this past weekend....


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And we're now getting reports of snow flurries and hail. Ah well, so much for that early spring we were enjoying...
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More enthusiasm than sense...

Most days this title phrase applies to my male feline, who has been known to run into walls and fall off of chairs. But, alas, this past weekend it applied to me.

First off, yes, I am okay. (Just have to throw that in there for the family members who read this.)

Friday's schedule was a bit off-kilter, and so I went to the gym later than usual. Thus I'd had some espresso already, which given my heart rate issues, might not have been entirely wise. So I very sensibly decided to take things slow.

My translation of this was to spend more time on weight machines and less on cardio. Spent about an hour and a quarter on weight machines, then moved over to the treadmill.

At this stage I must interject that my iPod is very old and quite possibly more stubborn than I am. I wanted to get to the other half of the alphabet of artists but it just wasn't going there. So I saw my 2 songs from the Top Gun soundtrack and decided that since I was just going to do a 15 minute run, those could get me started.

Have I mentioned how much I love... Well, "Danger Zone" led the playlist and I decided that I just couldn't run slow with that song playing. So I cranked the treadmill speed up...

Ok, compared to what you military guys do, I wasn't going fast at all. But I'd moved my pace up to shave about two minutes from my normal mile's pace. And so to avoid flying off the treadmill, I pretty much ran on the balls of my feet for five minutes. Good fun, but I thought it might be wise to check my heart rate. Hmmm... 203. I kept up the pace for a while, but given the post that was behind my treadmill, I eventually decided I'd better slow down so that I wouldn't get flung into the post when I passed out. Slowed it down, went home, showered... and when trying various shoes with my outfit, I started noticing that my feet were not their normal happy selves in high heels. My arches felt like they were getting ready to snap.

So, I've been limping around a little for the last couple days. Didn't keep me from trekking around the Oregon Coast a bit (pictures to come) but that was largely due to being able to wear my battered combat boots. I'm mostly recovered now, and plan to go back to the gym tomorrow. But I've got that treadmill's number...
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Deployed Air Force Reserve Pararescuemen Save Lives from Afghanistan Avalanches

PJ Stuff Story from Air Force link
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PJ Pic

PJ StuffA Pararescueman from the 212th Rescue Squadron jumps from a C-17 Globemaster III
over Katchemak Bay , Alaska , Feb. 10, 2010. The Pararescueman was participating in
an exercise that involved Pacific Air Force and Air Mobility Command C-17's
exploring capabilities in large formations. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Matt
Coleman-Foster

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Next 306th RQS Selection Day

PJ StuffNext 306th Rescue Squadron Selection Day
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Wednesday Hero

General NewsThis Weeks Post Was Actually Written By Sgt. McGowen A Year Before He Passed Away. He Was Suggested By His Granddaughter, Leigh, To Honor Him.

Capt. Lyle L. Gordon
Sgt. Charlie McGowen August 22, 1921 - December 5, 2009

U.S. Air
Force 1940-1945

In 1942 he was drafted into the Army Air Corps. He was sent to England. His trip there took him through Warrior, Alabama, Ft. McClellan, Ft. McPherson, Gulf Port, Mississippi, Chanute, Salt Lake City, El Paso, Alamorgoro, and New York City. Then he took the Queen Mary to the Fifth of Clyde in Scotland. Upon arriving he was sent to the Wending base in England. In his military service he was part of the World War II: 32 Bomb Group 578 and 579 Bomb Squadron Second Air Division, 8th Air Force, ETON 117 Wending, Norfolk, England. While stationed in Wending, he went to Piccadilly Circus in London. While he was there he visited the American Red Cross Center with friends. The center was Rainbow Corner. While there he was introduced to a lovely English lady named Margaret (Peggy) Johnston. It was love at first sight. They were married on January 13, 1945. They moved back to Alabama after the war and raised six children. They have ten grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

Sgt. Charlie & Peggy McGowen

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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PJ Pics

PJ StuffPararescuemen from the 31st Rescue Squadron, Kadena Air Base Japan climb out a HH-60G Pavehawk to respond to the survivors of a simulated C-130 crash during the exercise Pacific Thunder 09-01 hosted by Osan AB Republic of Korea, May 13. The overall goal of the exercise is to practice integrating all airframes necessary to rescue a downed Airman in a medium to high threat environment. Pacific Thunder is the largest combat search and rescue exercise ever for Pacific Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Stephenie Wade)

A Pararescuemen from the 31st Rescue Squadron, Kadena AB Japan treats a simulated protruding chest wound during the exercise Pacific Thunder 09-01 hosted by Osan AB, Republic of Korea May 13. The overall goal of the exercise is to practice integrating all airframes necessary to rescue a downed Airman in a medium to high threat environment. Pacific Thunder 09-01 is Pacific Air Force’s only exercise devoted to combat search and rescue. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Stephenie Wade)

A Pararescueman watches for the rescue helicopter, a HH-60G Pavehawk while the injured are treated after a simulated C-130 crash during exercise Pacific Thunder 09-01. The overall goal of the exercise is to practice integrating all airframes necessary to rescue a downed Airman in a medium to high threat environment. Hosted by Osan AB , Republic of Korea May 13, Pacific Thunder is the largest combat search and rescue exercise ever for Pacific Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Stephenie Wade)

A Pararescueman from the 31st Rescue Squadron, Kadena Air Base Japan hoist a non-ambulatory survivor of a simulated C-130 crash into a HH-60G Pavehawk during the exercise Pacific Thunder 09-01 hosted by Osan AB Republic of Korea May 13. The overall goal of the exercise is to practice integrating all airframes necessary to rescue a downed Airman in a medium to high threat environment. Pacific Thunder is the largest combat search and rescue exercise ever for Pacific Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Stephenie Wade)