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Tuesday, January 16 2018 @ 09:16 pm PST

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Cpl. Daniel Bedford
Moore

Cpl. Daniel Bedford Moore

86 years old from Mifflin, Wisconsin

June 12, 1838 - July 02, 1914

U.S.
Army

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Corporal Daniel Bedford Moore, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 9 April 1865, while serving with Company E, 11th Wisconsin Infantry, in action at Fort Blakely, Alabama. At the risk of his own life Corporal Moore saved the life of an officer who had been shot down and overpowered by superior numbers.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Sgt. Sergeant Philip A. McCulloch,
Jr.

Sergeant Philip A. McCulloch, Jr.

Company K, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, Regimental Combat Team Eight, SECOND Marine Division (Forward), I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward)

U.S. Marines

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Philip A. McCulloch, Jr., United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Squad Leader, Company K, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, Regimental Combat Team Eight, SECOND Marine Division (Forward), I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward) Afghanistan on 8 January 2011 in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. During a six-hour engagement with insurgent forces in Sangin District, Sergeant McCulloch led his squad of Marine sin a determined pursuit of a numerically superior enemy force. After being attacked by enemy fighters, he personally led his squad's counter attack by assuming point and closing on the enemy, pausing just long enough to destroy an enemy fighting positions with an AT-4. Once he regained the initiative, he pursued the enemy into a nearby row of compounds and forced them into fixed positions where many of them were destroyed by close air support and indirect fires, combined with maneuver. Maintaining constant pressure on the enemy, he forced them to fall back as aircraft departed for fuel and ammunition re-supply. Throughout the engagement, he aggressively drove his Marines to remain focused, exposing himself to enemy fire to identify enemy positions and coordinate fires in support of maneuver. Even after beginning to return to base, as the enemy again engaged the Marines, he controlled another section of helicopters with devastating effects, allowing his squad to return to friendly lines. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty, Sergeant McCulloch reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Chief Damage Controlman Regan Schraeder & Chief
Aviation Machinist's Mate Cedric
Hickey

Chief Damage Controlman Regan Schraeder & Chief Aviation Machinist's Mate Cedric Hickey

U.S.
Navy

Chief Damage Controlman Regan Schraeder(Left) and Chief Aviation Machinist's Mate Cedric Hickey move supplies on the flight deck of the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) during a vertical replenishment with the Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3). Monterey is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.

Photo courtesy U.S. Navy taken by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Billy Ho

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Maj. William Edward
Adams

Maj. William Edward Adams

31 years old from Kansas City, MO

A/227 Assault Helicopter Company, 52nd Aviation Battalion, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division

June 16, 1939 - May 25, 1971

U.S. Army

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Major William Edward Adams, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with A/227 Assault Helicopter Company, 52d Aviation Battalion, 17th Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kontum Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 25 May 1971. On that date, Major Adams volunteered to fly a lightly armed helicopter in an attempt to evacuate three seriously wounded soldiers from a small fire base which was under attack by a large enemy force. He made the decision with full knowledge that numerous anti-aircraft weapons were positioned around the base and that the clear weather would afford the enemy gunners unobstructed view of all routes into the base. As he approached the base, the enemy gunners opened fire with heavy machineguns, rocket-propelled grenades and small arms. Undaunted by the fusillade, he continued his approach determined to accomplish the mission. Displaying tremendous courage under fire, he calmly directed the attacks of supporting gunships while maintaining absolute control of the helicopter he was flying. He landed the aircraft at the fire base despite the ever-increasing enemy fire and calmly waited until the wounded soldiers were placed on board. As his aircraft departed from the fire base, it was struck and seriously damaged by enemy anti-aircraft fire and began descending. Flying with exceptional skill, he immediately regained control of the crippled aircraft and attempted a controlled landing. Despite his valiant efforts, the helicopter exploded, overturned, and plummeted to earth amid the hail of enemy fire. Major Adams' conspicuous gallantry, intrepidity, and humanitarian regard for his fellow man were in keeping with the most cherished traditions of the military service and reflected utmost credit on him and the United States Army.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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SSgt. Erich R.
Phillips

SSgt. Erich R. Phillips

Company C, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Parachute Infantry Regiment,

173d Airborne Brigade Combat Team

U.S. Army

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Staff Sergeant Erich R. Phillips, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving as Mortar Platoon Sergeant with Company C, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Parachute Infantry Regiment, 173d Airborne Brigade Combat Team, in action at Ranch House in Nuristan Province, Afghanistan, on 22 August 2007. Staff Sergeant Phillips' gallant actions and dedicated devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army. NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD: On 22 August 2007, at 0455L, the Ranch House Outpost at Aranas, Afghanistan, was attacked from all sides by a company-sized insurgent force, simultaneously engaging every post in the perimeter by multiple RPGs and small arms fire. Staff Sergeant Phillips was serving as the Mortar Platoon Sergeant with Company C, 2d Battalion, 503d Infantry Regiment (Airborne), 173d Airborne Brigade Combat Team. On that morning he woke up to the sound of intense small arms fire and RPG explosions. When he moved outside of his quarters he came under effective small arms fire and saw Afghan National Army (ANA) and Afghan Security Guard (ASG) forces fleeing from their post, which had swiftly been overrun by the insurgents. Staff Sergeant Phillips expertly positioned five soldiers, Private First Class White, Specialist Baldwin, Specialist Chavez, Sergeant Dirkinitis, and Special Schilling to defend the TOC, Aid Station, Mortar Pit and ASP, and led the way by returning fire on a quickly advancing enemy force from the vicinity of the ANA and ASG post while under intense RPG and small arms fire. He moved quickly to the TOC and reported directly to his Platoon Leader, First Lieutenant Ferrara, who told him that there was no communication with Post 3 and Post 4. Staff Sergeant Phillips returned to the mortar firing point to employ the 60-mm. mortars while staying in contact with Post 1, whose element continued to engage the overwhelming enemy assault with hand grenades and direct fire. With the insurgents within 15 meters of his position Staff Sergeant Phillips directed fires and hand grenades to suppress the enemy and protect the Platoon Leader, First Lieutenant Ferrara, who was talking to the company from his Platoon Command Post after the TOC had suffered several direct hits with RPGs rendering the antennas inoperable. Staff Sergeant Phillips' actions were essential in securing First Lieutenant Ferrara's position allowing the platoon leader to control indirect fire and CAS to thwart the enemy attack. When he learned that there were casualties at Post 2, Staff Sergeant Phillips took Sergeant Dirkinitis, the Platoon Medic, and assaulted upwards, 30 meters towards Post 2. Recognizing that Post 2 risked being isolated from the rest of the U.S. element he directed his team to give covering fire as he moved up the hill. As they moved Staff Sergeant Phillips and Sergeant Dirkinitis were pinned down by insurgents firing from the high ground near Post 3 and from behind the Class 1 shed 15 meters away. Soldiers at Post 2 told Staff Sergeant Phillips that there were multiple enemy personnel behind the Class 1 shed which was about 10 meters behind him. While under intense enemy fire he ran to a position from which he could throw multiple hand grenades to deter an enemy advance and continued to fire upon enemy positions. His decision to move toward Post 2 spread out the friendly line and was instrumental in preventing the enemy from overrunning the mortar pit and the Platoon Command Post as well as Post 2. As Staff Sergeant Phillips and Sergeant Dirkinitis continued to fight, Sergeant Dirkinitis was struck in the shoulder by a bullet. Staff Sergeant Phillips pulled him to cover while firing on the enemy. He recognized that he had to move to another position to save the wounded medic. He told Post 2 to provide covering fire while he dragged Sergeant Dirkinitis 15 meters back down the hill to a defilade position so he could be treated. Staff Sergeant Phillips then moved back to the mortar pit and directed Specialist Chavez to treat the casualty. At this point, First Lieutenant Ferrara had called in A-10s to strafe the enemy occupied ASG and ANA posts. As the insurgents' fire became sporadic, Staff Sergeant Phillips assembled a team to clear the Ranch House perimeter and recover Private First Class Deloria who had been isolated at Post 3. He lead the team up the hill and pulled Private First Class Deloria from beneath the rubble of the shattered Post 3. Staff Sergeant Phillips continued to organize the MEDEVAC of the casualties from Post 3 (Private First Class Deloria) and Post 2 (Sergeant Gonzalez, Sergeant Relph, Specialist Bell, and Private First Class Langevin) and moved them down the hill to the LZ to be evacuated. Through his quick thinking and total disregard for his own safety, Staff Sergeant Phillips prevented the Ranch House Outpost from being overrun by an enemy force three times larger and with superior fire power. His quick reaction in employing all available soldiers protected the Platoon CP from being overrun allowing external assets to be employed to defeat the enemy. He quickly assaulted toward Post 2 spreading out the friendly lines and directed lethal blows against the enemy halting their advance 10 meters short of the U.S. line. Absent this assault the enemy would have been able to maneuver in between the U.S. forces, isolating Post 2 from the mortar pit and breaking up the U.S. line of fire. Finally, he assembled an ad hoc force to clear the perimeter and recover the severely wounded Private First Class Deloria, who had been cut off for over 2 hours. His actions at Ranch House yielded invaluable intelligence with the death of MVT Hazrat Omar including enemy video tapes of attack plans, pictures of insurgents, and payroll documents utilized by ACM commanders. During the fierce three-hour battle at the Ranch House eleven U.S. soldiers, half of the U.S. garrison, were wounded. One ANA and one ASG Soldier were killed and one ASG Soldier was wounded. Eight insurgents were killed and a dozen more were wounded.

A year later, SSGT. Phillips was awarded the Silver Star. Staff Sergeant Erich R. Phillips, United States Army, was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, in Afghanistan, on 13 July 2008, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Parachute Infantry Regiment, 173d Airborne Brigade Combat Team. Staff Sergeant Phillips' valor and competence under intense fire were instrumental in repelling an overwhelming attack by an enemy force at least four times greater than his own. He saved his fellow paratroopers from an unstable missile and then led a relief force to save a beleaguered outpost. Staff Sergeant Phillips repeatedly risked his own life to save the lives of others.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Sgt. Richard W.
O'Neill

Sgt. Richard W. O'Neill

82 years old from New York, New York

Company D, 165th Infantry, 42d Division

August 28, 1898 - April 09, 1982

U.S. Army

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Sergeant Richard William O'Neill, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 30 July 1918, while serving with Company D, 165th Infantry, 42d Division, in action at Ourcq River, France. In advance of an assaulting line, Sergeant O'Neill attacked a detachment of about 25 of the enemy. In the ensuing hand-to-hand encounter he sustained pistol wounds, but heroically continued in the advance, during which he received additional wounds; but, with great physical effort, he remained in active command of his detachment. Being again wounded, he was forced by weakness and loss of blood to be evacuated, but insisted upon being taken first to the battalion commander in order to transmit to him valuable information relative to enemy positions and the disposition of our men.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Lance Cpl. Sean J.
McSweeney

Lance Cpl. Sean J. McSweeney

Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit

U.S. Marines

Lance Cpl. Sean J. McSweeney, an amphibious assault vehicle crewman with Company G., Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and native of Palmyra, N.J., cleans the barrel of a .50 caliber machine gun inside an AAV here, June 29. The Marines and Sailors of the 31st MEU are constantly engaged in training, education and gear maintenance while embarked aboard the ship, taking advantage of their time at sea. The 31st MEU is the only continuously forward-deployed MEU and is the Marine Corpsí force in readiness in the Asia-Pacific region.

Photo courtesy U.S. Marine Corps taken by Sgt. Jonathan Wright

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero Blogroll This post was suggested by Cindy
Theodore Harvey
Theodore Harvey

78 years old from Mescalero Apache Reservation, New Mexico

U.S. Army

Theodore Harvey was only 19 when he enlisted in the Army in 1954. He served with honor for 17 years when was discharged in 1971. Then one day, 41 years later, a social worker at Mr. Harvey's care center ask him what happened to his medals. "I never got them," he replied.

You can read more about Theodore Harvey here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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GySgt. John Basilone

GySgt. John Basilone

21 years old from Raritan, New Jersey

Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Marine Regiment, 5th Marine Division

November 4, 1916 - February 19, 1945

U.S. Marines

For extraordinary heroism and conspicuous gallantry in action against enemy Japanese forces, above and beyond the call of duty, while serving with the 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division in the Lunga Area, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, on 24 and 25 October 1942. While the enemy was hammering at the Marines' defensive positions, Sgt. Basilone, in charge of 2 sections of heavy machine guns, fought valiantly to check the savage and determined assault. In a fierce frontal attack with the Japanese blasting his guns with grenades and mortar fire, one of Sgt. Basilone's sections, with its gun crews, was put out of action, leaving only 2 men able to carry on. Moving an extra gun into position, he placed it in action, then, under continual fire, repaired another and personally manned it, gallantly holding his line until replacements arrived. A little later, with ammunition critically low and the supply lines cut off, Sgt. Basilone, at great risk of his life and in the face of continued enemy attack, battled his way through hostile lines with urgently needed shells for his gunners, thereby contributing in large measure to the virtual annihilation of a Japanese regiment. His great personal valor and courageous initiative were in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.

GySgt. Basilone was killed helping to guide a tank to safety that was trapped in a mine field under heavy mortar and artillery barrages during the invasion of Iwo Jima.

You can read more about GySgt. Basilone and his amazing bravery here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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1st Lt. Nathan M.
Krissoff

1st Lt. Nathan M. Krissoff

25 years old from Reno, Nevada

Headquarters and Service Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force

December 9, 2006

U.S. Marines

Nathan Krissoff enlisted in the Marine Corps. after the attacks on Sept. 11 out of a sense of duty to his country. 1st. Lt. Krissoff was killed in 2006 when his convoy was hit by an IED in al-Amariyah, Iraq. He was posthumously awarded a Purple Heart.

On Memorial Day his family shared some of his letters that he wrote to them while deployed.

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Capt. Barry F. Crawford , Jr.

Capt. Barry F. Crawford , Jr.

U.S. Air Force

The President of the United States of America awarded the Air Force Cross to Captain Barry F. Crawford, Jr., for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an armed enemy of the United States as Special Tactics Officer near Laghman Province, Afghanistan, on 4 May 2010. On that date, while attached to Army Special Forces Operational Detachment Alpha and their Afghan partner force, Captain Crawford conducted a helicopter assault into Hendor Village. Upon landing, Captain Crawford received reports that multiple groups of armed enemy were maneuvering into prepared fighting positions in the high ground around the village. As the assault force initiated clearance operations, they began to receive a high volume of accurate machine gun and sniper fire from an enemy force well over 100 fighters. As the assault force was attacked, Captain Crawford took decisive action to save the lives of three wounded Afghan soldiers and evacuate two Afghan soldiers killed in action. Recognizing that the wounded Afghan soldiers would die without evacuation to definitive care, Captain Crawford took decisive action and ran out into the open in an effort to guide the helicopter to the landing zone. Once the pilot had eyes on his position, Captain Crawford remained exposed, despite having one of his radio antennas shot off mere inches form his face, while he vectored in the aircraft. Acting without hesitation, Captain Crawford then bounded across open terrain, engaged enemy positions with his assault rifle and called in AH-64 strafe attacks to defeat the ambush allowing the aid-and-litter teams to move toward the casualties. While the casualties were being moved the team's exposed position once again came under attack from two enemy trucks that had moved into the area and were threatening the medical evacuation landing zone. As one of the aid-and-litter teams was pinned down by enemy fire, and the medical evacuation helicopter took direct hits from small arms fire, it departed with only four casualties leaving one wounded Afghan soldier on the ground. Captain Crawford developed, coordinated, and executed a plan to suppress the enemy, enabling the helicopter to return to the hot landing zone to retrieve the last casualty. While Captain Crawford's element exfiltrated the village, the assault force conducted a two kilometer movement over steep terrain with little to no cover. During this movement the ground force commander and Captain Crawford's element were ambushed and pinned down in the open from multiple enemy fighting positions, some as close as 150 meters away. Without regard for his own life, Captain Crawford moved alone across open terrain in the kill zone to locate and engage enemy positions with his assault riffle while directing AH-64 30-mm. strafe attacks. Continuing to move the team further over 1.5 kilometers of steep terrain with minimal cover, Captain Crawford again engaged the enemy with his assault rifle while integrating AH-64s and F-15E's in a coordinated air-to-ground attack plan that included strafing runs along with 500 and 2,0000-pound bomb and Hellfire missile strikes. Throughout the course of the ten hour firefight, Captain Crawford braved effective enemy fire and consciously placed himself at grave risk on four occasions while controlling over 33 aircraft and more than 40 airstrikes on a well-trained and well-prepared enemy force. His selfless actions and expert airpower employment neutralized a numerically superior enemy force and enabled friendly elements to exfiltrate the area without massive casualties. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Captain Crawford has reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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