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Tuesday, August 21 2018 @ 01:15 am PDT

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Capt. Glenn Black

Capt. Glenn Black

From Idana, Kansas

U.S. Army Air Corps

From his Silver Star citation: For gallantry in action while participating in aerial flight in the Mediterranean Theater of Operations as pilot and flight leader of a B-25 type aircraft. On 22 June 1944, Lieutenant Black led a flight on a mission against shipping and harbor installations at Leghorn, Italy. On the bomb run intense, accurate anti-aircraft fire was encountered by the formation, holing many aircraft, as a result of the heavy defenses, Lieutenant Black sustained a shattered right arm, his co-pilot was painfully injured in the hip, one engine and the hydraulic lines were shot out and gasoline flooded the ship due to a direct hit on the gas tank. Despite his severe and painful wounds, Lieutenant Black, with the aid of his co-pilot, held the plane on course in to the target, enabling his bombardier to drop his bombs on their objective. By the time a friendly field was reached, the effects of the co-pilots hip wound seriously compromised the strength of his legs and, although almost at the point of complete exhaustion from the loss of blood, Lieutenant Black manipulated the rudders while his co-pilot handled the other controls, still at Lieutenant Black's directions. In spite of the feathered propeller, and without flaps or wheels down, a successful crash-landing was completed. By his great determination and outstanding heroism, Lieutenant Black has reflected the highest credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.

You can read more about Capt. Black here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

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Cmdr. George S.
Rentz

Cmdr. George S. Rentz

59 years old from Lebanon, Pennsylvania

Commander USS Houston (CA-30)

July 25, 1882 - March 1, 1942

U.S.
Navy

A Navy chaplain who served during World War I and World War II, Cmdr. George Rentz was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for selfless heroism following the loss of the USS Houston (CA-30) in the Battle of Sunda Strait becoming the only Navy Chaplain to be so honored during the war.

You can read more here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

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Staff Sgt. Michael H.
Ollis

Staff Sgt. Michael H. Ollis

24 years old from Staten Island, New York

2nd Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (Light)

August 28, 2013

U.S.
Army

The heroic actions of Staff Sgt. Michael H. Ollis saved the life of a Polish officer during a "complex, three-pronged attack" on their base in eastern Afghanistan, according to Combined Joint Task Force-101.

Ollis, a 10th Mountain Division Soldier, was killed while defending Forward Operating Base Ghazni, Aug. 28, 2013. As a result of his actions that day, he will be honored with the Silver Star, and by Poland with the Polish Armed Forces Gold Medal.

His parents, Linda and Robert Ollis, are to receive the Silver Star at Fort Drum, Oct. 24. The Polish Ministry of Defense will tentatively present its medal in a ceremony in New York City, Nov. 8.

You can read more about SSgt. Ollis here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

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Nelson Draper

Nelson Draper

96 years old from Barstow, California

June 23, 1917 - September 22, 2013

U.S. Marines

Another Navajo Code Talker has passed away. Nelson Draper died on September 22 at the age of 96. There are only an estimated 25-65 Code Talkers left with us. I couldn't find much on Mr. Draper, but what I could you can read here and here.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Cmdr. Samuel David
Dealey

Cmdr. Samuel David Dealey

37 years old from Dallas, Texas

Commander USS Harder (SS-257)

September 13, 1906 - August 24, 1944

U.S.
Navy

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Harder during her 5th War Patrol in Japanese-controlled waters. Floodlit by a bright moon and disclosed to an enemy destroyer escort which bore down with intent to attack, Comdr. Dealey quickly dived to periscope depth and waited for the pursuer to close range, then opened fire, sending the target and all aboard down in flames with his third torpedo. Plunging deep to avoid fierce depth charges, he again surfaced and, within 9 minutes after sighting another destroyer, had sent the enemy down tail first with a hit directly amidship. Evading detection, he penetrated the confined waters off Tawi Tawi with the Japanese Fleet base 6 miles away and scored death blows on 2 patrolling destroyers in quick succession. With his ship heeled over by concussion from the first exploding target and the second vessel nose-diving in a blinding detonation, he cleared the area at high speed. Sighted by a large hostile fleet force on the following day, he swung his bow toward the lead destroyer for another "down-the-throat" shot, fired 3 bow tubes and promptly crash-dived to be terrifically rocked seconds later by the exploding ship as the Harder passed beneath. This remarkable record of 5 vital Japanese destroyers sunk in 5 short-range torpedo attacks attests the valiant fighting spirit of Comdr. Dealey and his indomitable command.

You can read more about Cmdr. Dealey here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Cpl. Michael J.
Crescenz

Cpl. Michael J. Crescenz

19 years old from Philadelphia, Penn.

4th Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 196th Infantry Brigade

January 14, 1949 - November 20, 1968

U.S.
Army

On Nov. 20, 1968, Michael J. Crescenz of Philadelphia walked into an ambush on Nui Chom. His squad was pinned down when he made a snap decision to grab an M60 machine gun and charge the bunkers. He took out three, killing six enemy soldiers who may have been dumbstruck in their last seconds to see a lone American running into their fusillade of bullets.

As he charged a fourth bunker, Crescenz, 19, was killed.

For his heroism, he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor:

Cpl. Crescenz distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a rifleman with Company A. In the morning his unit engaged a large, well-entrenched force of the North Vietnamese Army whose initial burst of fire pinned down the lead squad and killed the 2 point men, halting the advance of Company A. Immediately, Cpl. Crescenz left the relative safety of his own position, seized a nearby machine gun and, with complete disregard for his safety, charged 100 meters up a slope toward the enemy's bunkers which he effectively silenced, killing the 2 occupants of each. Undaunted by the withering machine gun fire around him, Cpl. Crescenz courageously moved forward toward a third bunker which he also succeeded in silencing, killing 2 more of the enemy and momentarily clearing the route of advance for his comrades. Suddenly, intense machine gun fire erupted from an unseen, camouflaged bunker. Realizing the danger to his fellow soldiers, Cpl. Crescenz disregarded the barrage of hostile fire directed at him and daringly advanced toward the position. Assaulting with his machine gun, Cpl. Crescenz was within 5 meters of the bunker when he was mortally wounded by the fire from the enemy machine gun. As a direct result of his heroic actions, his company was able to maneuver freely with minimal danger and to complete its mission, defeating the enemy. Cpl. Crescenz's bravery and extraordinary heroism at the cost of his life are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

You can read more about Cpl. Crescenz here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

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Comdr. Howard W.
Gilmore

Comdr. Howard W. Gilmore

40 years old from Selma, Alabama

September 29, 1902 - February 7, 1943

U.S.
Navy

For distinguished gallantry and valor above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Growler during her Fourth War Patrol in the Southwest Pacific from 10 January to 7 February 1943. Boldly striking at the enemy in spite of continuous hostile air and antisubmarine patrols, Comdr. Gilmore sank one Japanese freighter and damaged another by torpedo fire, successfully evading severe depth charges following each attack. In the darkness of night on 7 February, an enemy gunboat closed range and prepared to ram the Growler. Comdr. Gilmore daringly maneuvered to avoid the crash and rammed the attacker instead, ripping into her port side at 11 knots and bursting wide her plates. In the terrific fire of the sinking gunboat's heavy machineguns, Comdr. Gilmore calmly gave the order to clear the bridge, and refusing safety for himself, remained on deck while his men preceded him below. Struck down by the fusillade of bullets and having done his utmost against the enemy, in his final living moments, Comdr. Gilmore gave his last order to the officer of the deck, "Take her down." The Growler dived; seriously damaged but under control, she was brought safely to port by her well-trained crew inspired by the courageous fighting spirit of their dead captain.

You can read more about Comdr. Gilmore here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt
III

Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt III

56 years old from Cove Neck, NY

September 13, 1887 - July 12, 1944

U.S. Army

When people hear the name Theodore Roosevelt they think President of the United States. What they probably don't think of is Theodore Roosevelt III. The presidents son. A man who, at the age of 56, lead forces in the invasion of Normandy on D-Day and was awarded the Medal Of Honor:

For gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty on 6 June 1944, in France. After 2 verbal requests to accompany the leading assault elements in the Normandy invasion had been denied, Brig. Gen. Roosevelt's written request for this mission was approved and he landed with the first wave of the forces assaulting the enemy-held beaches. He repeatedly led groups from the beach, over the seawall and established them inland. His valor, courage, and presence in the very front of the attack and his complete unconcern at being under heavy fire inspired the troops to heights of enthusiasm and self-sacrifice. Although the enemy had the beach under constant direct fire, Brig. Gen. Roosevelt moved from one locality to another, rallying men around him, directed and personally led them against the enemy. Under his seasoned, precise, calm, and unfaltering leadership, assault troops reduced beach strong points and rapidly moved inland with minimum casualties. He thus contributed substantially to the successful establishment of the beachhead in France.

You can read more about Brig. Gen. Roosevelt here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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John Edward Allen
John Edward Allen

89 years old from Rio Rancho, New Mexico

U.S. Air Force

John Edward Allen, a New Mexico veteran who served as a Tuskegee Airman during World War II and later earned honors for his Air Force service during the Vietnam War, died July 29th after a long battle with cancer.

The NAACP Albuquerque Chapter President Harold Bailey said Allen died from multiple myeloma. He was 84.

You can read more about John E. Allen here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Staff Sgt. April
Welch

Staff Sgt. April Welch

U.S. Air Force

Staff Sgt. April Welch wraps the head of a simulated victim during a Major Accident Response Exercise July 24, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The purpose of the MARE was to test the response of the base’s and the city of Jacksonville’s first responders. Welch is a medical technician assigned to the 19th Aerospace Medicine Squadron.

Photo courtesy U.S. Air Force taken by Airman 1st Class Cliffton Dolezal

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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