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Tuesday, January 16 2018 @ 09:17 pm PST

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Brigadier Gen. James H.
Howard

Brigadier Gen. James H. Howard

81 years old from Bay Pines, Florida

356th Fighter Squadron, 354th Fighter Group

April 13, 1913 - March 18, 1995

U.S. Air Force

General, then Colonel, James Howard, was the only fighter pilot to be awarded the Medal Of Honor in the European theater of WWII.

From his citation:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy near Oschersleben, Germany, on 11 January 1944. On that day Col. Howard was the leader of a group of P-51 aircraft providing support for a heavy bomber formation on a long-range mission deep in enemy territory. As Col. Howard's group met the bombers in the target area the bomber force was attacked by numerous enemy fighters. Col. Howard, with his group, at once engaged the enemy and himself destroyed a German ME. 110. As a result of this attack Col. Howard lost contact with his group, and at once returned to the level of the bomber formation. He then saw that the bombers were being heavily attacked by enemy airplanes and that no other friendly fighters were at hand. While Col. Howard could have waited to attempt to assemble his group before engaging the enemy, he chose instead to attack single-handed a formation of more than 30 German airplanes. With utter disregard for his own safety he immediately pressed home determined attacks for some 30 minutes, during which time he destroyed 3 enemy airplanes and probably destroyed and damaged others. Toward the end of this engagement 3 of his guns went out of action and his fuel supply was becoming dangerously low. Despite these handicaps and the almost insuperable odds against him, Col. Howard continued his aggressive action in an attempt to protect the bombers from the numerous fighters. His skill, courage, and intrepidity on this occasion set an example of heroism which will be an inspiration to the U.S. Armed Forces

You can read more about Gen. Howard here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Tech Sgt. Charles
Coolidge

Tech Sgt. Charles Coolidge

92 years old from Chattanooga, Tennessee

3rd Battalion, 141st Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division

U.S.
Army

Tech Sgt. Charles Coolidge was born in 1921 in Tennessee, where he still live and works in the family business. In 2006 he was awarded the Légion d'honneur by officials of the French consulate.

From his Medal Of Honor citation: Leading a section of heavy machine guns supported by 1 platoon of Company K, he took a position near Hill 623, east of Belmont sur Buttant, France, on October 24, 1944, with the mission of covering the right flank of the 3d Battalion and supporting its action. T/Sgt. Coolidge went forward with a Sergeant of Company K to reconnoiter positions for coordinating the fires of the light and heavy machine guns. They ran into an enemy force in the woods estimated to be an infantry company. T/Sgt. Coolidge, attempting to bluff the Germans by a show of assurance and boldness called upon them to surrender, whereupon the enemy opened fire. With his carbine, T/Sgt. Coolidge wounded 2 of them. There being no officer present with the force, T/Sgt. Coolidge at once assumed command. Many of the men were replacements recently arrived; this was their first experience under fire. T/Sgt. Coolidge, unmindful of the enemy fire delivered at close range, walked along the position, calming and encouraging his men and directing their fire. The attack was thrown back. Through 25 and October 26, the enemy launched repeated attacks against the position of this combat group but each was repulsed due to T/Sgt. Coolidge's able leadership. On October 27, German infantry, supported by 2 tanks, made a determined attack on the position. The area was swept by enemy small arms, machine gun, and tank fire. T/Sgt. Coolidge armed himself with a bazooka and advanced to within 25 yards of the tanks. His bazooka failed to function and he threw it aside. Securing all the hand grenades he could carry, he crawled forward and inflicted heavy casualties on the advancing enemy. Finally it became apparent that the enemy, in greatly superior force, supported by tanks, would overrun the position. T/Sgt. Coolidge, displaying great coolness and courage, directed and conducted an orderly withdrawal, being himself the last to leave the position. As a result of T/Sgt. Coolidge's heroic and superior leadership, the mission of this combat group was accomplished throughout 4 days of continuous fighting against numerically superior enemy troops in rain and cold and amid dense woods.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Maj. Richard Bong

Maj. Richard Bong

24 years old from Poplar, Wisconsin

49th Fighter Group, V Fighter Command

September 25, 1920 - August 6, 1945

U.S.
Army Air Force

Maj. Richard Bong is the United States' highest-scoring air ace, having shot down at least 40 Japanese aircraft during World War II. He was a fighter pilot in the U.S. Army Air Forces (USAAF) and a recipient of the Medal of Honor. All of his aerial victories were in the P-38 Lightning fighter aircraft.

You can read more on Maj. Bong here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero BlogrollI want to wish all of you a very Merry Christmas. And to all those who are serving and are unable to be home, be safe and thank you.

Josh Groben - I'll Be Home For Christmas

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Sgt. Greg N. Riewer

Sgt. Greg N. Riewer

30 years old from Frazee, Minnesota

2nd Combined Arms Battalion, 136th Infantry, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 34th Infantry Division

March 23, 2007

U.S.
Army

Sgt. Greg N. Riewer, 28, of Frazee, was killed while on patrol March 23, 2007 in Fallujah with soldiers from the Bemidji-based Company A, 2nd Battalion, 136th Infantry, when his vehicle was struck by a roadside bomb, the Guard said.

"The loss of Sgt. Riewer is a tragedy," Maj. Gen. Larry Shellito, the adjutant general of Minnesota, said in a statement. "He was proudly serving his state and nation in a combat zone when he was taken from us."

You can read more about Sgt. Riewer here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Maj. Thomas McGuire
Jr.

Maj. Thomas McGuire Jr.

24 years old from Sebring, Florida

475th Fighter Group

August 1, 1920 - January 7, 1945

U.S. Air Force

On January 7, 1945, McGuire was leading a group of four P-38s - himself, Major Jack Rittmayer (four victories), Captain Edwin Weaver (two victories) and Lieutenant Douglas Thropp (one victory) - on a fighter sweep over northern Negros Island in the central Philippines. Their aim was to gain victories. McGuire desperately wanted to pass Major Richard Bong's score of 40 kills. Descending through cloud cover, McGuire’s flight circled a Japanese airfield at Fabrica and then proceeded to a second airstrip at Manapla (also referred to as Carolina). As they approached Manapla, they were confronted by a lone Ki-43 “Oscar”, which immediately engaged McGuire's flight.

You can read more about Maj. McGuire here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero Blogroll This post was suggested by Michael

Maj. Don Beerbower

Maj. Don Beerbower

22 years old from Hill City, Minnesota

353d Fighter Squadron, 354th Fighter Group, 9th Air Force

August 26, 1921 - August 9, 1944

U.S. Air Force

A fighter pilot who has brought down five or more enemy aircraft was called a flying ace. From December 1943 to Aug. 9, 1944, Beerbower became a triple ace, shooting down more than 15 German planes, making him the second highest ace in the 9th Air Force.

Due to pilot losses and Beerbower’s own advancements based on flying and leadership skills, Beerbower was promoted to major and made squadron commander in June 1944 — less than nine months after his arrival in Europe. At only 22 years old, he already was a great fighter pilot, respected and liked by the men in his squadron.

You can read more about Maj. Beerbower here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero Blogroll This post was suggested by Kathi

Tlingit Code
Talkers

Tlingit Code Talkers

We all know about the Navajo Code Talkers, but chances are you've never heard of the Tlingit Code Talkers from Alaska. During a ceremony on November 20, they were finally recognized for the contribution in the war with Congressional Gold Medals.

You can read more about the Tlingit Code Talkers here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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MSgt. Woodrow
Keeble

MSgt. Woodrow Keeble

64 years old from Waubay, South Dakota

May 16, 1917 - January 28, 1982

U.S. Army National Guard

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty: Master Sergeant Woodrow W. Keeble distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with an armed enemy near Sangsan-ni, Korea, on October 20, 1951. On that day, Master Sergeant Keeble was an acting platoon leader for the support platoon in Company G, 19th Infantry, in the attack on Hill 765, a steep and rugged position that was well defended by the enemy. Leading the support platoon, Master Sergeant Keeble saw that the attacking elements had become pinned down on the slope by heavy enemy fire from three well-fortified and strategically placed enemy positions. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Master Sergeant Keeble dashed forward and joined the pinned-down platoon. Then, hugging the ground, Master Sergeant Keeble crawled forward alone until he was in close proximity to one of the hostile machine-gun emplacements. Ignoring the heavy fire that the crew trained on him, Master Sergeant Keeble activated a grenade and threw it with great accuracy, successfully destroying the position. Continuing his one-man assault, he moved to the second enemy position and destroyed it with another grenade. Despite the fact that the enemy troops were now directing their firepower against him and unleashing a shower of grenades in a frantic attempt to stop his advance, he moved forward against the third hostile emplacement, and skillfully neutralized the remaining enemy position. As his comrades moved forward to join him, Master Sergeant Keeble continued to direct accurate fire against nearby trenches, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. Inspired by his courage, Company G successfully moved forward and seized its important objective. The extraordinary courage, selfless service, and devotion to duty displayed that day by Master Sergeant Keeble was an inspiration to all around him and reflected great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army

You can read more about MSgt. Keeble here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by Michael

Leland Diamond

Leland Diamond

61 years old from Toledo, Ohio

May 30, 1890 – September 20, 1951

U.S. Marines

Master Gunnery Sergeant Leland "Lou" Diamond is famous within the U.S. Marine Corps as the classic example of the "Old Breed" — tough, hard-fighting career Marines who served in the corps in the years between World War I and World War II.

You can read more about Gunny Diamond here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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