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Tuesday, January 16 2018 @ 09:17 pm PST

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Pfc. Richard Bigouette

Pfc. Richard Bigouette

Bravo Company, 602nd Aviation Support Battalion

U.S. Army

A 2nd Infantry Division Soldier gave the gift of life to a 9-year-old Korean girl when he saved her from drowning at Haeundae Beach in Busan June 13.

Pfc. Richard Bigouette of Bravo Company, 602nd Aviation Support Battalion, was swimming a little way from shore with Pfc. Joshua Davis, also of Bravo 602nd ASB. Suddenly, Bigouette heard frantic screams from people on the beach pointing to a place beyond the waves, more than 50 yards out into the water.

A little girl was struggling for her life as she tried to remain above the water. Another girl, standing waist-deep in the choppy water between the waves, was crying for help.

You can read more on Pfc. Bigouette here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Capt. Jennifer Curtis

Capt. Jennifer Curtis

U.S. Air Force

In April 2011, Captain Jennifer Curtis received a short-notice deployment to Firebase Chamkani, Afghanistan, where she embedded with U.S. Army Special Forces to assist with village stability operations. Captain Curtis quickly realized that her deployment would be dangerous when she first arrived at the firebase located in the mountains on the border of Afghanistan and Pakistan and her helicopter was targeted by mortar rounds. After being on the receiving end of more than 126 mortar rounds over the course of her deployment, Captain Curtis became accustomed to this hazardous way of life.

One night, the mortars hit her encampment. "Rockets were shot and landed right in the middle of our compound," she said. "There was a lot of shrapnel wounds. People were unconscious". Because the camp was on lockdown, Curtis was the only medic on the scene for the first 20 minutes of the attack. She didnít have much time to think.

You can read more on Capt. Jennifer Curtis here and here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Navy SEALs Tyrone Woods & Glen Doherty and Sean Smith

September 11, 2012

U.S. Navy U.S. Air Force

On Tuesday, September 11, what appears to be a coordinated attack on the American embassy in Libya took the lives of four Americans. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and two servicemen and one former serviceman. Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty were Navy SEALs and Sean Smith was a veteran of the Air Force.

You can read more at the links below:

Tyrone Woods

Glen Doherty

Sean Smith

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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1st Lt. Alexander Bonnyman, Jr.

1st Lt. Alexander Bonnyman, Jr.

33 years old from Knoxville, Tennessee

2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division

May 2, 1910 - Nov 23, 1943

U.S. Marines

Alexander Bonnyman didn't have to go to war. Because of his age and the fact that he was running a company that was producing material that was vital to the war effort, Bonnyman was exempt from military obligation. But he enlisted anyway. Though it wasn't his first stint the military. A few year before he was in the Army Air Forces but was washed out after only three months for buzzing too many control towers.

You can read more about 1st. Lt. Bonnyman here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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1st Sgt. Rodney James Tadashi Yano

1st Sgt. Rodney James Tadashi Yano

25 years old from Kealakekua Kona, Hawaii

Air Cavalry Troop, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment

December 13, 1943 - January 1, 1969

U.S. Army

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to First Sergeant Rodney James Tadashi Yano (ASN: 10116085), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Air Cavalry Troop, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Bien Hoa, Republic of Vietnam, on 1 January 1969. Sergeant First Class Yano was performing the duties of crew chief aboard the troop's command-and-control helicopter during action against enemy forces entrenched in dense jungle. From an exposed position in the face of intense small arms and anti-aircraft fire he delivered suppressive fire upon the enemy forces and marked their positions with smoke and white phosphorous grenades, thus enabling his troop commander to direct accurate and effective artillery fire against the hostile emplacements. A grenade, exploding prematurely, covered him with burning phosphorous, and left him severely wounded. Flaming fragments within the helicopter caused supplies and ammunition to detonate. Dense white smoke filled the aircraft, obscuring the pilot's vision and causing him to lose control. Although having the use of only one arm and being partially blinded by the initial explosion, Sergeant First Class Yano completely disregarded his welfare and began hurling blazing ammunition from the helicopter. In so doing he inflicted additional wounds upon himself, yet he persisted until the danger was past. Sergeant First Class Yano's indomitable courage and profound concern for his comrades averted loss of life and additional injury to the rest of the crew. By his conspicuous gallantry at the cost of his life, in the highest traditions of the military service, Sergeant First Class Yano has reflected great credit on himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

You can read more about 1st Sgt. Yano here.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Airman 1st Class Brooke Goose

Airman 1st Class Brooke Goose

U.S. Air Force

Airman 1st Class Brooke Goose poses for a photo Aug. 24, 2012, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. Goosen is the only female out of 28 Airmen in the 7th Equipment Maintenance Squadron Dyess metal shop and has more than seven years experience with welding.

Photo Courtesy AF.mil taken by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Stefanko

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Col. Mary Louise Milligan Rasmuson

Col. Mary Louise Milligan Rasmuson

April 11, 1911 - July 30, 2012

U.S. Army

Col. Mary Louise Milligan Rasmuson, a member of the first Women's Army Corps, or WAC, passed away on July 30 at the age of 101.

During her service with the WAC, Rasmuson worked with Congress to improve laws regarding female service credit and benefits. After leaving the Army and until her death, Rasmuson remained an ally for female service members and veterans.

You can read more about Col. Rasmuson here and here.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Almost two weeks ago a tragic event took place in Aurora, Colorado when a gunman walked into a movie theater and began shooting, killing 12 people. Three of those who were killed were military personnel.

Petty Officer 3rd Class John Larimer was 27 years old and served in the United States Navy. He was killed protecting his girlfriend from the gunfire.

Staff Sgt. Jesse Childress was 29 years old and served in the United States Air Force Reserves. He was killed protecting a friend who went with him to the movie.

Jonathan T. Blunk was a Navy veteran who left the service in 2009. He served three tours in the Persian Gulf and North Arabian Sea between 2004 and 2009 and was a certified firefighter and emergency medical technician. He died shielding his girlfriend from the gunfire.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Lt. Kristin Love

Lt. Kristin Love

U.S. Marines

Lt. Kristin Love, number 19, division officer of the Patient Administration Department, Naval Hospital, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, poses with fellow team-mates of the San Diego Surge. San Diego Surge is one of 62 teams of the Women's Football Alliance.

Photo Taken by Tracy Wong

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Sgt. James P. Muldoon

Sgt. James P. Muldoon

23 years old from Bells, Texas

1st Battalion, 68th Combined Arms Regiment, 3rd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division

June 29, 2006

U.S. Army

Sgt. James Muldoon was born in Denver, Colorado but settled in Bells, Texas. He died on June 29, 2006 from injuries he suffered during a raid on a safe house in Baqubah, Iraq. For his actions that day, Sgt. Muldoon was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star with Valor.

James Muldoon loved the Broncos. "He played football and track when he was in high school, and he was a big football fan, a big Broncos fan," said his widow. "Heís always liked them since he was little." "He was a joker, constantly, and he was a fun guy, and loved his family." Sgt. Muldoon left behind a wife and daughter, who turned 8 this year, and his parents.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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