Welcome to The WatchCat
Wednesday, April 23 2014 @ 02:22 AM PDT

Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version

Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by Michael

Lt. Col. Jerry Coleman

Lt. Col. Jerry Coleman

89 years old from San Diego, California

VMSB-341, VMA-323

September 14, 1924 - January 5, 2014

U.S. Marines

Not only was Jerry Coleman a pro-baseball player, playing for the Yankees from 1949 to 1957, but he was also a Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Marines. Coleman postponed his entry in to the MLB to join the Marines. He flew 120 missions in WWII and Korea and earned two Distinguished Flying Crosses and thirteen Air Medals.

You can read more about Lt. Col. Coleman here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

Wednesday Hero Logo

Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version

Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by SJ

2nd Lt. Walter Ehlers
2nd Lt. Walter Ehlers

92 years old from Long Beach, California

18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division

May 7, 1921 - February 20, 2014

U.S. Army

On February 20 2nd Lt. Walter Ehlers passed away. 2nd Lt. Ehlers was the last surviving Medal Of Honor recipient from D-Day.

From his MoH citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty on 9-10 June 1944, near Goville, France. S/Sgt. Ehlers, always acting as the spearhead of the attack, repeatedly led his men against heavily defended enemy strong points exposing himself to deadly hostile fire whenever the situation required heroic and courageous leadership. Without waiting for an order, S/Sgt. Ehlers, far ahead of his men, led his squad against a strongly defended enemy strong point, personally killing 4 of an enemy patrol who attacked him en route. Then crawling forward under withering machinegun fire, he pounced upon the guncrew and put it out of action. Turning his attention to 2 mortars protected by the crossfire of 2 machineguns, S/Sgt. Ehlers led his men through this hail of bullets to kill or put to flight the enemy of the mortar section, killing 3 men himself. After mopping up the mortar positions, he again advanced on a machinegun, his progress effectively covered by his squad. When he was almost on top of the gun he leaped to his feet and, although greatly outnumbered, he knocked out the position single-handed. The next day, having advanced deep into enemy territory, the platoon of which S/Sgt. Ehlers was a member, finding itself in an untenable position as the enemy brought increased mortar, machinegun, and small arms fire to bear on it, was ordered to withdraw. S/Sgt. Ehlers, after his squad had covered the withdrawal of the remainder of the platoon, stood up and by continuous fire at the semicircle of enemy placements, diverted the bulk of the heavy hostile fire on himself, thus permitting the members of his own squad to withdraw. At this point, though wounded himself, he carried his wounded automatic rifleman to safety and then returned fearlessly over the shell-swept field to retrieve the automatic rifle which he was unable to carry previously. After having his wound treated, he refused to be evacuated, and returned to lead his squad. The intrepid leadership, indomitable courage, and fearless aggressiveness displayed by S/Sgt. Ehlers in the face of overwhelming enemy forces serve as an inspiration to others.

You can read more about 2nd Lt. Ehlers here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

Wednesday Hero Logo
Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version

Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollFor some reason there doesn't seem to be a Wednesday Hero post today, so I offer this instead:

WWI Europe Photos on Modern Photos

H/T LJB

If you've spent time in Europe you've probably relished the deep sense of history there. But these photos take it a step further, reminding us of who stood where we stood. If we stop for a moment, their spirits can almost touch ours.

And in that moment, when time dissolves and we remember the terrible battles that give us the life we have today, we find ourselves held accountable by them. Have we used our freedom responsibly? Do we remember their sacrifices with gratitude? Do we live as they would have lived if they'd had the chance?

Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version

Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by SJ

SSgt. William
Guarnere

SSgt. William Guarnere

90 years old from Philadelphia, Penn.

Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division

April 28, 1923 - March 8, 2014

U.S.
Army

SSgt. William "Wild Bill" Guarnere passed away three weeks ago at the age of 90. SSgt. Guarnere was part of Easy Company, made famous by the HBO mini-series "Band Of Brothers". During his three years of service, SSgt. Guarnere saw action throughout Europe, including being part of the invasion of Normandy on D-Day. He was awarded the Silver and Bronze stars, the Purple Heart and the French Liberation Medal.

You can read more about SSgt. Guarnere here and here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

Wednesday Hero Logo

Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version

Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by Michael

Lt. Milton Ricketts

Lt. Milton Ricketts

28 years old from Baltimore, Maryland

USS Yorktown (CV-5)

August 5, 1913 - May 8, 1942

U.S.
Navy

For extraordinary and distinguished gallantry above and beyond the call of duty as Officer-in-Charge of the Engineering Repair Party of the U.S.S. Yorktown in action against enemy Japanese forces in the Battle of the Coral Sea on 8 May 1942. During the severe bombarding of the Yorktown by enemy Japanese forces, an aerial bomb passed through and exploded directly beneath the compartment in which Lt. Ricketts' battle station was located, killing, wounding or stunning all of his men and mortally wounding him. Despite his ebbing strength, Lt. Ricketts promptly opened the valve of a near-by fireplug, partially led out the fire hose and directed a heavy stream of water into the fire before dropping dead beside the hose. His courageous action, which undoubtedly prevented the rapid spread of fire to serious proportions, and his unflinching devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

You can read more here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

Wednesday Hero Logo

Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version

Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by Sarah

U.S.
Army

Yesterday marked the end of a 12-year review by the Pentagon when 24 soldiers from WWII to Vietnam, who were denied the award they earned, finally received their Medals Of Honor.

Spc. 4 Santiago J. Erevia

Staff Sgt. Melvin Morris

Sgt. 1st Class Jose Rodela

Sgt. Candelario Garcia

Spc. 4 Leonard L. Alvarado

Staff Sgt. Felix M. Conde-Falcon

Spc. 4 Ardie R. Copas

Spc. 4 Jesus S. Duran

Cpl. Joe R. Baldonado

Cpl. Victor H. Espinoza

Sgt. Eduardo C. Gomez

Pfc. Leonard M. Kravitz

Master Sgt. Juan E. Negron

Master Sgt. Mike C. Pena

Pvt. Demensio Rivera

Pvt. Miguel A. Vera

Sgt. Jack Weinstein

Private Pedro Cano

Pvt. Joe Gandara

Pfc. Salvador J. Lara

Sgt. William F. Leonard

Staff Sgt. Manuel V. Mendoza

Sgt. Alfred B. Nietzel

1st Lt. Donald K. Schwab

You can find more information here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

Wednesday Hero Logo

Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version

Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by Michael

Cmdr. Ernest Edwin
Evans

Cmdr. Ernest Edwin Evans

36 years old from Pawnee, Oklahoma

Commanding Officer USS Johnson (DD 557)

August 13, 1908 - October 25, 1944

U.S.
Navy

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Johnston in action against major units of the enemy Japanese fleet during the battle off Samar on 25 October 1944. The first to lay a smokescreen and to open fire as an enemy task force, vastly superior in number, firepower and armor, rapidly approached. Comdr. Evans gallantly diverted the powerful blasts of hostile guns from the lightly armed and armored carriers under his protection, launching the first torpedo attack when the Johnston came under straddling Japanese shellfire. Undaunted by damage sustained under the terrific volume of fire, he unhesitatingly joined others of his group to provide fire support during subsequent torpedo attacks against the Japanese and, outshooting and outmaneuvering the enemy as he consistently interposed his vessel between the hostile fleet units and our carriers despite the crippling loss of engine power and communications with steering aft, shifted command to the fantail, shouted steering orders through an open hatch to men turning the rudder by hand and battled furiously until the Johnston, burning and shuddering from a mortal blow, lay dead in the water after 3 hours of fierce combat. Seriously wounded early in the engagement, Comdr. Evans, by his indomitable courage and brilliant professional skill, aided materially in turning back the enemy during a critical phase of the action. His valiant fighting spirit throughout this historic battle will venture as an inspiration to all who served with him.

You can read more about Commander Evans here and here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

Wednesday Hero Logo

Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version

Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by Sarah

Sir Nicholas George
Winton

Sir Nicholas George Winton

104 years old from Hampstead, London

Wednesday Hero was started to honor the men and women of the United States military, but this week we're doing something a little different. Sir Nicholas George Winton is a British humanitarian who will turn 105 this May. On the eve of WWII, Winston was instrumental in the rescue of 669 children, mostly Jewish, from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia. Sadly, many of the children he saved lost their parents in concentration camps.

You can read more about Sir Nicholas Winston here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

Wednesday Hero Logo

Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version

Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by Michael

Lt. Col. Iceal
Hambleton

Lt. Col. Iceal Hambleton

85 years old from Tucson, Arizona

42nd Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron

November 16, 1918 - September 19, 2004

U.S. Air Force

Lt. Col. Iceal Hambleton was a navigator who was shot down over Vietnam in April of 1972. He was the only one of six crewmen to survive and was behind enemy lines for 11 days before being rescued.

You can read more about Lt. Col. Hambleton here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

Wednesday Hero Logo

Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version

Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero Blogroll This post was suggested by Michael

Lt.Col. Jerry
Coleman

Lt. Col. Jerry Coleman

89 years old from San Diego, Calif.

VMTB-341, VMA-323

September 14, 1924 - January 5, 2014

U.S. Marines

Jerry Coleman, a decorated war hero, Yankee World Series MVP and Hall of Fame San Diego Padres broadcaster, died January 5 at age 89 after a career of more than 70 years in baseball.

Coleman signed with the Yankees out of the San Francisco sandlots in 1942 only to spend the next three years as a Marine bomber pilot in the Pacific theater of World War II, flying 57 combat missions over the Solomon Islands. Upon his return from the war he rejoined the Yankees only to be called back to duty in '51. He flew another 120 missions in Korea and rose to the rank of lieutenant colonel.

You can read more about Lt. Col. Coleman here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

Wednesday Hero Logo

--