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Wednesday, July 23 2014 @ 04:53 AM PDT

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A Grateful Nation?

Military Retirees: "You Betrayed Us, Congress"

Most of you already understand the impact that reducing military retirement pay will have on our veterans and on future readiness. If that's you, then skip to the end of this post and use the link to send a letter.

But if you're wondering why this is such a big deal, especially as others are "tightening their belts" let me point out a few factors to consider.

For 20 years or more, these retirees (and often their families) were government property. They wrote a blank check to the government up to and including their lives. Their spouses and children had health problems and anxiety disorders. No one had a guarantee that they would make it through. They served proudly with a white-knuckle grip. But they had a golden hope: if and when they served long enough, those that lived would have a taste of that security that they had given to their country. Their families would receive not a folded flag but a livable pension from this "grateful nation."

But this isn't just about honoring the past. This is about securing our future.

You're right if you're thinking that military service is about far more than money. Honor is the heartbeat of our all-volunteer military. Honor respects honor, and when it is violated, that is when our military falls apart. Our enemies know this and use false allegations to undermine the honor of the men and women who serve. They served with the knowledge of the government's promise to take care of them and their families. To change retirement benefits for current retirees and anyone who is currently serving reeks of dishonor. Will they continue to love this country when its government breaks its promises to them? Only they can answer that, but such treatment of our veterans is akin to what veterans experienced after Vietnam. A nation that breaks promises to its veterans will be ill defended. Morale plummets when soldiers don't trust the government they serve. I saw this in Russia; they have failed their veterans and their military is much weaker as a result.

For these reasons and many others, this is one of those times when we all need to speak up. The Military Officers Association of America has an editable form letter available that you can send to Pres. Obama and our senators. Please, take 5 minutes and send it. These veterans gave 20 years for you.

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Scramble Pt 2

ScramblesSpotting Human Trafficking

SEAL of Peace: Safening.org

The Bully Too Close to Home

Air Force Announces Additional Force Management Programs to Reduce Force Size

Airline Secret Santa Surprise

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Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by Michael

Maj. Thomas McGuire
Jr.

Maj. Thomas McGuire Jr.

24 years old from Sebring, Florida

475th Fighter Group

August 1, 1920 - January 7, 1945

U.S. Air Force

On January 7, 1945, McGuire was leading a group of four P-38s - himself, Major Jack Rittmayer (four victories), Captain Edwin Weaver (two victories) and Lieutenant Douglas Thropp (one victory) - on a fighter sweep over northern Negros Island in the central Philippines. Their aim was to gain victories. McGuire desperately wanted to pass Major Richard Bong's score of 40 kills. Descending through cloud cover, McGuire’s flight circled a Japanese airfield at Fabrica and then proceeded to a second airstrip at Manapla (also referred to as Carolina). As they approached Manapla, they were confronted by a lone Ki-43 “Oscar”, which immediately engaged McGuire's flight.

You can read more about Maj. McGuire here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Scramble Pt 1

ScramblesMy "scramble" links are on different devices, so I'm going to put this one together as I have opportunity.

Pacific County Woman Joins Coast Guard Elite

It's Not FAIR!

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Vida Loca

General NewsYes, I'm still here. And I'm even going to pay to renew the domain. But it's been crazy around here...

We're trying to buy land and build a custom home.
We've adopted a stray cat who would be quite at home in Spec Ops.
We're trying to make sure our child survives till age 2. (See prior comments on SOCOM)
Company Christmas Party. Spent every moment of "free time" last week making sure we were appropriately prepared. Will probably spend the next month telling the stories of the night.

There's more, but duty calls. Stay sane, or if you can't, stay positive!
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Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero Blogroll This post was suggested by Michael

Maj. Don Beerbower

Maj. Don Beerbower

22 years old from Hill City, Minnesota

353d Fighter Squadron, 354th Fighter Group, 9th Air Force

August 26, 1921 - August 9, 1944

U.S. Air Force

A fighter pilot who has brought down five or more enemy aircraft was called a flying ace. From December 1943 to Aug. 9, 1944, Beerbower became a triple ace, shooting down more than 15 German planes, making him the second highest ace in the 9th Air Force.

Due to pilot losses and Beerbower’s own advancements based on flying and leadership skills, Beerbower was promoted to major and made squadron commander in June 1944 — less than nine months after his arrival in Europe. At only 22 years old, he already was a great fighter pilot, respected and liked by the men in his squadron.

You can read more about Maj. Beerbower here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero Blogroll This post was suggested by Kathi

Tlingit Code
Talkers

Tlingit Code Talkers

We all know about the Navajo Code Talkers, but chances are you've never heard of the Tlingit Code Talkers from Alaska. During a ceremony on November 20, they were finally recognized for the contribution in the war with Congressional Gold Medals.

You can read more about the Tlingit Code Talkers here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Go

General News"Most days, my real battle is doing good versus doing nothing."

Always Go to the Funeral

This article is true on so many levels, I don't know where to begin. Someone once said that it's the things you don't do that turn into the biggest regrets. Yes. These critical moments don't get do-overs. So show up when people need you. It's okay if you're a mess. It's ok if for whatever reason it's all you can do to just get in the door. The action or inaction will be remembered.

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Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by Michael

MSgt. Woodrow
Keeble

MSgt. Woodrow Keeble

64 years old from Waubay, South Dakota

May 16, 1917 - January 28, 1982

U.S. Army National Guard

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty: Master Sergeant Woodrow W. Keeble distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with an armed enemy near Sangsan-ni, Korea, on October 20, 1951. On that day, Master Sergeant Keeble was an acting platoon leader for the support platoon in Company G, 19th Infantry, in the attack on Hill 765, a steep and rugged position that was well defended by the enemy. Leading the support platoon, Master Sergeant Keeble saw that the attacking elements had become pinned down on the slope by heavy enemy fire from three well-fortified and strategically placed enemy positions. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Master Sergeant Keeble dashed forward and joined the pinned-down platoon. Then, hugging the ground, Master Sergeant Keeble crawled forward alone until he was in close proximity to one of the hostile machine-gun emplacements. Ignoring the heavy fire that the crew trained on him, Master Sergeant Keeble activated a grenade and threw it with great accuracy, successfully destroying the position. Continuing his one-man assault, he moved to the second enemy position and destroyed it with another grenade. Despite the fact that the enemy troops were now directing their firepower against him and unleashing a shower of grenades in a frantic attempt to stop his advance, he moved forward against the third hostile emplacement, and skillfully neutralized the remaining enemy position. As his comrades moved forward to join him, Master Sergeant Keeble continued to direct accurate fire against nearby trenches, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. Inspired by his courage, Company G successfully moved forward and seized its important objective. The extraordinary courage, selfless service, and devotion to duty displayed that day by Master Sergeant Keeble was an inspiration to all around him and reflected great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army

You can read more about MSgt. Keeble here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Friday Scramble

ScramblesTwo really great pieces on the needs of veterans in our society:

Veteran on Quest to Ensure Old Soldiers Don't Die Alone

Veterans Need to Share the Moral Burden of War