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Thursday, November 15 2018 @ 11:45 am PST

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Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt
III

Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt III

56 years old from Cove Neck, NY

September 13, 1887 - July 12, 1944

U.S. Army

When people hear the name Theodore Roosevelt they think President of the United States. What they probably don't think of is Theodore Roosevelt III. The presidents son. A man who, at the age of 56, lead forces in the invasion of Normandy on D-Day and was awarded the Medal Of Honor:

For gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty on 6 June 1944, in France. After 2 verbal requests to accompany the leading assault elements in the Normandy invasion had been denied, Brig. Gen. Roosevelt's written request for this mission was approved and he landed with the first wave of the forces assaulting the enemy-held beaches. He repeatedly led groups from the beach, over the seawall and established them inland. His valor, courage, and presence in the very front of the attack and his complete unconcern at being under heavy fire inspired the troops to heights of enthusiasm and self-sacrifice. Although the enemy had the beach under constant direct fire, Brig. Gen. Roosevelt moved from one locality to another, rallying men around him, directed and personally led them against the enemy. Under his seasoned, precise, calm, and unfaltering leadership, assault troops reduced beach strong points and rapidly moved inland with minimum casualties. He thus contributed substantially to the successful establishment of the beachhead in France.

You can read more about Brig. Gen. Roosevelt here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

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For the Years Ahead

9/11Twelve years.
And one year since Benghazi.
They have been marked by wars, new goals and adventures, successes, failures, and too many funerals. Too many beloved hearts not beating.
But other hearts still beat, and the fight for the people we still have with us grows stronger. New beloveds do not usurp the old, but they give us the strength to remember. They make sure we live in the present, and not in the past.

This is what I've learned in these twelve years: We honor the victims and heroes of 9/11 best when we live with love and courage. No man left behind. No gift ungiven.

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Wednesday Hero

Wednesday Hero BlogrollThis post was suggested by Cindy
John Edward Allen
John Edward Allen

89 years old from Rio Rancho, New Mexico

U.S. Air Force

John Edward Allen, a New Mexico veteran who served as a Tuskegee Airman during World War II and later earned honors for his Air Force service during the Vietnam War, died July 29th after a long battle with cancer.

The NAACP Albuquerque Chapter President Harold Bailey said Allen died from multiple myeloma. He was 84.

You can read more about John E. Allen here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

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Staff Sgt. April
Welch

Staff Sgt. April Welch

U.S. Air Force

Staff Sgt. April Welch wraps the head of a simulated victim during a Major Accident Response Exercise July 24, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The purpose of the MARE was to test the response of the base’s and the city of Jacksonville’s first responders. Welch is a medical technician assigned to the 19th Aerospace Medicine Squadron.

Photo courtesy U.S. Air Force taken by Airman 1st Class Cliffton Dolezal

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

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Internet Privacy Laws

General NewsForeign Policy: How We Killed Privacy

Groklaw: Forced Exposure

I have some quibbles with both pieces, but the information contained therein is worth your time. The WatchCat household has been having some animated discussions on this topic recently, and we're still researching some of the legal angles.

A couple off-the-cuff recommendations/plans from those discussions:

1) Don't use Windows 8. Windows 7 is tolerable for now, but for long term go Mac, or follow the example of the German secret police and go for Linux. See The Issues of Windows 8

2) I hope to eventually offer encryption/decryption keys for our correspondence.

3) Don't say anything online that you wouldn't say in a crowded bar or coffee shop. That's the rough equivalent of the expectation of privacy you have on the internet.

4) Use a paid email service and encourage associates to use the same service. There's a modicum of extra privacy within a domain, particularly in academic or healthcare domains.

5) Delete cookies regularly. Block pop-ups. Get more vigilant about all the stuff we should have been doing all along.

6) Use IronKey for sensitive web browsing and passwords. Yes, the NSA can crack it. But it will take more time and effort.

And if you're wondering about me, the blog, etc.... I know I'm not truly hidden. My family asked me to take my real name off the blog years ago, and I did, but I understand that nothing truly disappears from the internet. I stand by my opinions here, and I will take consequences as needed. I'm pretty sure the NSA knows how to find me. But I won't give anyone a roadmap to me or my loved ones. I live by rule #3, and I encourage you to do the same.

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Conversations

General NewsThe context is too complicated to describe here, but a recent conversation stopped me in my tracks. Just a few simple words: "He really doesn't understand." Most times, when we hear those words, it's an accusation against the person in question. How dare they not understand? Are they idiots, or are they bad people who refuse to emulate the decency that is us?

Isn't that what we really mean when we complain that someone doesn't understand?

But this conversation was different. "He doesn't understand" was a valid explanation for all that frustrated me. Truth is, good people can be clueless.

They don't know that their actions hurt you, and even if they did, half the time they wouldn't know why.

They don't know that they drive your BP through the roof. (I remember a coworker from another country who said "Do you get what I mean?" after about every third sentence. I don't remember her points; I just remember that I was ready to go postal after a week of it.)

They don't know that the ways they blow off steam make you need to blow off steam.

And they don't get that there is so much more to your story than what you've told.

There's just too much coming at all of us. Too much information, too many crises, too many demands on our time. We're overloaded and it means that few people really have the ability to seek true understanding.

Applied to a third person, these simple words were a gift. And they echoed Christ's words, "Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do." Time to stop confusing cluelessness with evil.
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Cpl. Daniel Bedford
Moore

Cpl. Daniel Bedford Moore

86 years old from Mifflin, Wisconsin

June 12, 1838 - July 02, 1914

U.S.
Army

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Corporal Daniel Bedford Moore, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 9 April 1865, while serving with Company E, 11th Wisconsin Infantry, in action at Fort Blakely, Alabama. At the risk of his own life Corporal Moore saved the life of an officer who had been shot down and overpowered by superior numbers.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

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Blackberries

General NewsThere's a great little produce place in a town called Oregon City that we like to visit when business takes us that way. It's the kind of place where the shopping inspires the menu. And this weekend, it was mostly fruit that came home.

It's been a busy weekend, so when I eat it's usually standing in the kitchen, often with my other hand doing something else. This morning was no exception as I popped a few succulent blackberries in my mouth while "really" prepping a child's breakfast.

But just for a moment, I stopped. The wild sweetness took me back to childhood, to prowling around with a cool whip container in search of the best blackberries. To my grandparents' acre, to a hundred roadsides and path sides. To a time when I actually had time to pick blackberries and the biggest worry was whether I might prick a finger or stain my clothes.

Sometimes we just have to wonder how our lives got this crazy. Some things are necessary, but how much of this craziness do we just do to ourselves?

I don't know. A number of friends and family have been having emergencies these days. But I speculate on how many of those accidents and strokes and pains were driven by stress. I'm not pointing fingers; if you know anything about my chaotic life you know I wouldn't dare. The only thing I can say for myself is that my household has a long-term plan to live a different kind of life someday.

I want my kids to grow up picking blackberries, not living via Blackberry.

I know the "value of my time" equations, but it falls apart at a $3 pint of blackberries. Why do I pay $3 to get a product instead of an experience?

And maybe "make blackberry pie" needs to be somewhere on that list of life's goals.
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Wednesday Hero

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Sgt. Sergeant Philip A. McCulloch,
Jr.

Sergeant Philip A. McCulloch, Jr.

Company K, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, Regimental Combat Team Eight, SECOND Marine Division (Forward), I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward)

U.S. Marines

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Philip A. McCulloch, Jr., United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Squad Leader, Company K, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, Regimental Combat Team Eight, SECOND Marine Division (Forward), I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward) Afghanistan on 8 January 2011 in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. During a six-hour engagement with insurgent forces in Sangin District, Sergeant McCulloch led his squad of Marine sin a determined pursuit of a numerically superior enemy force. After being attacked by enemy fighters, he personally led his squad's counter attack by assuming point and closing on the enemy, pausing just long enough to destroy an enemy fighting positions with an AT-4. Once he regained the initiative, he pursued the enemy into a nearby row of compounds and forced them into fixed positions where many of them were destroyed by close air support and indirect fires, combined with maneuver. Maintaining constant pressure on the enemy, he forced them to fall back as aircraft departed for fuel and ammunition re-supply. Throughout the engagement, he aggressively drove his Marines to remain focused, exposing himself to enemy fire to identify enemy positions and coordinate fires in support of maneuver. Even after beginning to return to base, as the enemy again engaged the Marines, he controlled another section of helicopters with devastating effects, allowing his squad to return to friendly lines. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty, Sergeant McCulloch reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Polish Military Member Dies on Mt. Hood

General NewsClimber Dies After Falling 1,000 Feet on Mount Hood

I have reason to believe he may have been a reader of this blog. Memory Eternal.