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Thursday, September 21 2017 @ 03:53 pm PDT

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General NewsI live between two worlds. My days now are filled with laundry, driving to school, running the HOA and being the “company wife” in partnership with a man who is far too good at his work. I’m blessed in many ways and I choose to embrace this season of life. Yet there’s another side of me, the part unsurprised by the recent attacks in Paris (and Beirut, and Baghdad.) It’s the part of me that lived in London during the “Troubles,” the part that navigated more crazy situations in other countries than I want to remember, the part that found a home when studying the Special Operations Executive of WWII. That part of me looks at the mom part of me and quietly announces:

Game on, NOW.

It’s Game On for all of us. Whether we’re on the front lines or the sidelines, we need a sharper attitude to deal with mass shootings, suicide bombers and borderless wars. It’s less apple-pie and more occupied France or blitzed London. When I lived in London, we had absolutely no tolerance for unattended packages. My favorite stories were about people who accidentally left their lunch on a bench only to have it destroyed by the bomb squad. In Heathrow, an unattended suitcase instantly drew attention, and everyone held their breath until it was claimed.

“Tolerance” gets us nowhere. Tolerance allows a stench in the community and accepts a lower standard of behavior until we become the victims, then yowls for justice. In short, tolerance cannot stand up to reality. Compassion, on the other hand, says that we all screw up but we’re going to work together to make this better. Compassion can withstand harsh reality unchanged. Compassion demands more, not less. Compassion builds a stronger community and is intolerant of evil.

What does this mean for Paris, Beirut, Baghdad, Syria, New York or Portland? It means we report suspicious behavior to the authorities. It means we speak up when good people do stupid things. It means we build a mindset of preparedness so that when things go wrong, we know our options and can make a rational decision to act in a way that improves the situation. There’s a beautiful story about a Paris bookstore that sheltered people during the crisis. This is what is required of us: to hold on to those nearest to us and to act. Most of us will never be heroes of the headlines. That’s okay. We probably wouldn’t look good in the limelight. It’s far better to be able to look yourself in the eye the next day, knowing you did everything in your power. Make no mistake; the battles are coming.

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